Bluebird recovery project: Helping Bluebirds since 1991.

Male Bluebird -Baird

Male Bluebird -Baird

Three species of the North American Bluebird were near extinction just 20 years ago due to habitat loss and the introduction of the highly aggressive European starling and house sparrow. To add to the nesting woes, people cut down trees to make way for urban sprawl. In the country, farmers installed metal posts as replacement for old wooden fence posts, which contained nesting cavities. The Natural Area Guardians began a Bluebird Recovery Program in 1991 with just 25 nest boxes. Since then, the number of bluebirders has expanded. Thanks to the efforts of many volunteers, the bluebird population in the county has increased significantly.

With its gentle ways, beautiful song and colors of the sky, the bluebird won the heart of many people, who experimented with designs of nest boxes for them. The eastern bluebird needs a hole exactly 1.5 inches in diameter, the other bluebird species slightly larger.

The two most important factors in successful bluebirding:

MONITORING: checking the boxes regularly to insure success.

HABITAT: the proper placing of the box.

People can provide nest boxes along country roads and in rural yards. Bluebirds prefer open areas with short grass — away from wooded and brushy areas which attract the people-friendly, but aggressive House Wren.

People must also consider other predators, such as house cats and raccoons. That’s why it’s a good idea to use predator guards on the nest box poles.

Various designs of bluebird boxes offer varying levels of safety to bluebirds. You can obtain a box plan that provides optimal safety by contacting Wild Birds Unlimited or the North American Bluebird Society.

For more information, contact info@nulljdcf.org

Upcoming Events

Native Bee & Pollinator Landowner & Partner Workshop

August 4 @ 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

JDCF, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, is hosting an informational workshop covering native bees in the Jo Daviess County area. Topics to be discussed include; native bee ecology and life history, sampling techniques and photography, and efforts to conserve native bees, including the federally endangered Rusty Patched Bumble Bee. Please join […] Read More

Find out more »

Meteors on the Mound

August 11 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Join JDCF and the Planetary Studies Foundation to catch a glimpse of the Perseid meteor shower from atop Horseshoe Mound on Saturday, August 11th from 7-11 PM. Enjoy family-friendly activities and learn about meteors before the sunset ushers in the celestial show! The event will be cancelled if it is raining, so please check jdcf.org […] Read More

Find out more »

Fall Forest Hike

September 15 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

With fall on the way, the appearance of trees changes significantly and identifying them can be tricky – unless you know your bark, berries & nuts. Join us to celebrate the change of season with a Fall Forest Walk on Saturday, September 15th from 1:00- 3:00pm at the Schurmeier Teaching Forest. This free event will […] Read More

Find out more »

Critters of the Night

October 20 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Join JDCF on Saturday, October 2oth at 10:00 AM to learn about some of our nocturnal friends, owls and bats. This program, geared towards a middle school grade level, introduces the life cycle of the owl and its food and habitat. It also identifies the characteristics that make the owl a perfect predator and member […] Read More

Find out more »